The index of happiness in the UK

The index of happiness in the UK

15 January 2011

We’ve been hearing everywhere, for the last month: Crăciun fericit! An nou fericit! Or: Merry Christmas! Happy New Year! But, I wonder, to what extent do these expressions translate the same wish – in other words, do “fericit” and “happy” mean one and the same thing? Do the British feel happiness in the same way we do? Or does happiness feel different for them? There are in fact two aspects of this question. The first one is: what does “happy holidays” mean for different nations? The second one is: can we extrapolate this meaning of happiness (attributed to festive times) for the notion of happiness in general? In other words, when someone says, “I’m happy,” “such and such news made me happy,” or “my children lead a happy life in such and such place,” does this person attempt to communicate the same kind of feeling or state as the one we associate with the holidays?

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Bloody Sunday

Bloody Sunday

23 September 2010

One of the reasons I am interested in jurisprudence is that you can easily follow the different interpretative theories and their effects. It is possible for different investigations of the same event (or “case”) to have varied results, sometimes even contradictory. Admittedly, this (as it usually happens) can be attributed to the differences between the investigation methods or the quantity and quality of the material available (including the human one – e.g. witnesses). But it is also the theories or the emphasis placed, within these, on one interpretative locus or another that can significantly influence the result of the analysis or process. Justice is a field that provides one the best exemplifications of the famous Nietzsche’s saying that “there are no facts, only interpretations”. Although many may dispute the first half of the maxim, when it comes to justice, because many legal cases are based on events that are difficult to neglect or catalogue only as “interpretative material”.

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Thoughts of reform

Thoughts of reform

17 July 2010

What are the terms employed and which ideas form the basis of a discussion on a reform of the justice system for different nations? What causes these debates and how do these profound motivations vary from one society to the other? Are we all moved by the same irregularities, abuses or voids in the justice arena – or can we talk about different sensitivities from one cultural space to the other, as much as we talk about changes in people’s preoccupations with the laws and justice system in different times? I tend to believe that our sensitivities and motivations vary, indeed, in space as much as (if not more) in time.

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